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Posts tagged with "BYOT"

BYOD and One-to-One

Few people today would argue with the idea that technology offers powerful tools for teaching, learning, and communicating. But how do we ensure that access to such tools is ongoing and ubiquitous, rather than an optional “frill” that teachers and students use only occasionally? Participants in this working session were addressing this question through 1:1 initiatives, Bring Your Own (BYO) solutions, or some combination of the two.

- See more at: http://www.schoolcio.com/cio-feature-articles/0109/byod-and-one-to-one/54155#sthash.H6d4PGO3.dpuf

More Schools Embracing BYOT Tech Programs, Easing on Smartphones

I wonder how many times we say “You Can’t Do That” to kids when they come back to school each year? No NO NO no NO No NO NO no NO! I saw this on a wall at one of my district high schools a couple of days back. Preparing our students for the real world? I wonder if the campus administration would be able to follow that same policy if it applied to them? 
BYOD? Not at this campus.

I wonder how many times we say “You Can’t Do That” to kids when they come back to school each year? No NO NO no NO No NO NO no NO! I saw this on a wall at one of my district high schools a couple of days back. Preparing our students for the real world? I wonder if the campus administration would be able to follow that same policy if it applied to them? 

BYOD? Not at this campus.

Forrester: work-mandated 'bring your own computer' imminent

What is the effect of this on education?

From the article…

Forrester predicts that within three years, most companies will make any customer-provided technology the norm, and purge rules forbidding personal devices to the point that self-purchasing may become a requirement for new employees. Information technology departments’ primary concerns with employee-owned hardware are usually security-related. Without a coherent and strict information-sanitization policy in place, an employee’s Internet habits outside the workplace could introduce a virus or other malware into the company network.



Read more: http://www.electronista.com/articles/12/06/13/byoc.increasing.every.year.thousands.spent.annually.per.employee/#ixzz1xltprp9m

May 6

BYOT: Bring Your Own Technology - Video on msnbc.com

Two years ago, Forsyth County School District outside Atlanta launched a technology program, encouraging students to BYOT – bring your own technology. NBC’s Rehema Ellis reports.

May 1

Students Have the Technology. It's Time We Let Them Use It. | EdTech Magazine

This is an article I wrote about year ago—TBH

If you count cell phones and other Wi-Fi–capable devices, K–12 may be close to achieving a one-to-one student-to-computer ratio – the Holy Grail of educational technology. We’ve gotten there, in large part, through no concerted effort of our own. While district IT directors like myself were paying attention to the desktop and workstation vendors at trade shows and ensuring our students were connected in controlled, filtered, exclusive environments, our students and their families were paying attention to television advertising and buying devices that kept them connected beyond our walls in uncontrolled, unfiltered and inclusive arenas.

That disconnect between our school environments and the real world can’t be good for students. During his frequent industry keynote addresses, Will Richardson, author of the influential educational technology blog Weblogg-ed, likes to hold up his cell phone and tell his audience that students have access to “the sum total of human knowledge in a device the size of a deck of cards.” That means everything, both good and bad.

Most schools prohibit the use of personal electronics on campus. But this ban rarely applies to faculty and administrators. Students see the hypocrisy of these policies, of course, and bring their gadgets anyway, betting that teachers are too preoccupied to catch them while they text under their desks – the 21st century equivalent of note passing.

eSchool News » Teachers share tips for using smart phones as learning tools in class, at home » Print

From the article:

For years, schools have banned the use of cell phones in schools. But today, some schools are cautiously embracing smart phones as a student-friendly technology that can enhance lessons at little cost to schools.

“This is their life,” said Barbara Horner, an eighth grade language arts teacher at the Emma C. Attales School in Absecon, N.J.

She shared student projects at the 15th annual “From My Classroom to Yours” technology conference March 14, sponsored by the Southern Regional Institute & Educational Technology Training Center, or SRI & ETTC, at Richard Stockton College.

The all-day conference offered workshops on a variety of technology, from interactive whiteboards to online programs such as the virtual-dissection program Froguts. Patricia Weeks, director of the SRI & ETTC, said a major advantage to smart phones is that students already know how to use them.

“The teachers are interested in integration, how to use the technology to improve the lesson,” Weeks said. “With a smart phone or tablet, they don’t have to teach the students how to use the technology itself.”

Speakers stressed that no matter how cool the technology, it is still only a tool, not an end in and of itself.

Pocket-Based Learning: My Cellphone Classroom | Powerful Learning Practice

From the blog:

On my commute one morning recently, one of the local radio stations was discussing a ban on Ugg boots by a Philadelphia school district because students were hiding their cell phones in the calf-high versions and using them in class. The radio announcers were discussing how cell phones in the classroom are a distraction and that “real learning” doesn’t take place with a mobile device in hand. After listening to the announcers and various other callers lament the student use of cell phones in the classroom, I decided to call in and offer a different perspective.

What did I say? Bring them on!

I am a proponent of BYOD (bring your own device) learning. I very rarely travel anywhere without my iPhone or iPad, and I can’t really blame my students if they do the same. I see the “addiction” students have to their cell phones as an opportunity to engage in learning since I view cell phones as another teaching tool, not a distraction.