Holt Think: Ed, Creativity, Tech, Administration

RSS

Posts tagged with "BYOD"

Schools moving toward ‘BYOD’ with student technology

From the Article:

"In Prince William County, this school year marks the third for BYOD, and its use has been on the rise, said A.J. Phillips, supervisor of instructional technology services. The first year, high schools, for example, had an average of 45 active devices in use at any given time during the school day, and last year that average rose to 534.

“Every year I’ve seen an increase in the number of devices,” she said. Use varies by school and teacher, she said. “Like any tool in the classroom, some teachers are going to embrace it and some are not.”

(Source: Washington Post)

Apr 7

Pros and Cons of BYOD Infographic

Pros-and-Cons-of-BYOD-in-Education-Infographic
Find more education infographics on e-Learning Infographics

Interesting perspective. Is it because we think the child cannot be trusted with an electronic device, even though they are probably carrying a smartphone?

Interesting perspective. Is it because we think the child cannot be trusted with an electronic device, even though they are probably carrying a smartphone?

BYOD and One-to-One

Few people today would argue with the idea that technology offers powerful tools for teaching, learning, and communicating. But how do we ensure that access to such tools is ongoing and ubiquitous, rather than an optional “frill” that teachers and students use only occasionally? Participants in this working session were addressing this question through 1:1 initiatives, Bring Your Own (BYO) solutions, or some combination of the two.

- See more at: http://www.schoolcio.com/cio-feature-articles/0109/byod-and-one-to-one/54155#sthash.H6d4PGO3.dpuf

More Schools Embracing BYOT Tech Programs, Easing on Smartphones

I think this is a very good illustration about how far we have come and why schools need to embrace the consumer technology. Whoever made this, nicely done. Props.

I think this is a very good illustration about how far we have come and why schools need to embrace the consumer technology. Whoever made this, nicely done. Props.

Thoughts on BYOD for Sharo Dickerson

Sharo Dickerson on Facebook asked several people to respond to her questions about BYOD. Here are my responses to her:

(1) What do you think will it entail for a BYOD program to become successful in teaching and learning?

  • There are several things in no particular order of importance:
  •  The teachers have to be trained to accept students bringing a wide variety of equipment into the classroom. This means that the burden of teaching HOW to use the equipment is no longer on the teacher but rather than the student.
  • There must be accommodations made for students that do not have equipment, be it using BYOD in group or having equipment in class for students without. 
  • The students without must also have some kind of ability ot access tech outside of class. 
  • You have to be careful that students without are not left behind by those with.
  • You have to make sure that your district has the infrastructure in place to handle the new devices.
  • There has to be a paradigm shift away from locking everything down in the IT department. 
  • There has to be a system set up that protect the devices if they are on campus. Theft will be a problem unless this is addressed and there is nothing worse than a pissed off parent wondering why their $600 ipad was stolen.

(2) What do you think would make teachers use BYOD in classroom instruction? in student engagement?

  • Training training training! There will have to be a shift in thinking because for years we have trained teachers to NOT allow these devices. Now all of a sudden it will be ok? 
  • We also need to move training away from device-specific type towards more of holistic training on what can be done with technology in general.
  • We need to work on teaching students responsibility. If kids are allowed to bring their Smartphones with their own data plans, then what happens when Billy is using it to surf porn during lunch? He is not on our network, he is not using our device…things get dicey and gray. Do you take away his device and privileges? 
  • School districts will have to become device agnostic, which will be a big hairy deal for IT departments who will feel threatened.
  • I would go slow and pilot at different schools first.

Here are some references:

http://www.edtechmagazine.com/k12/article/2013/01/what-districts-should-know-about-byod-and-digital-learning

http://stager.tv/blog/?p=2397

http://mfeldstein.com/does-byod-solve-or-worsen-k-12-tech-woes/

I wonder how many times we say “You Can’t Do That” to kids when they come back to school each year? No NO NO no NO No NO NO no NO! I saw this on a wall at one of my district high schools a couple of days back. Preparing our students for the real world? I wonder if the campus administration would be able to follow that same policy if it applied to them? 
BYOD? Not at this campus.

I wonder how many times we say “You Can’t Do That” to kids when they come back to school each year? No NO NO no NO No NO NO no NO! I saw this on a wall at one of my district high schools a couple of days back. Preparing our students for the real world? I wonder if the campus administration would be able to follow that same policy if it applied to them? 

BYOD? Not at this campus.

Sep 8

Going BYOD

Going BYOD
Presented By: OnlineColleges.net

Forrester: work-mandated 'bring your own computer' imminent

What is the effect of this on education?

From the article…

Forrester predicts that within three years, most companies will make any customer-provided technology the norm, and purge rules forbidding personal devices to the point that self-purchasing may become a requirement for new employees. Information technology departments’ primary concerns with employee-owned hardware are usually security-related. Without a coherent and strict information-sanitization policy in place, an employee’s Internet habits outside the workplace could introduce a virus or other malware into the company network.



Read more: http://www.electronista.com/articles/12/06/13/byoc.increasing.every.year.thousands.spent.annually.per.employee/#ixzz1xltprp9m

Jun 7

If you need to explain BYOD to someone, this is a good intro.

eSchool News » Teachers share tips for using smart phones as learning tools in class, at home » Print

From the article:

For years, schools have banned the use of cell phones in schools. But today, some schools are cautiously embracing smart phones as a student-friendly technology that can enhance lessons at little cost to schools.

“This is their life,” said Barbara Horner, an eighth grade language arts teacher at the Emma C. Attales School in Absecon, N.J.

She shared student projects at the 15th annual “From My Classroom to Yours” technology conference March 14, sponsored by the Southern Regional Institute & Educational Technology Training Center, or SRI & ETTC, at Richard Stockton College.

The all-day conference offered workshops on a variety of technology, from interactive whiteboards to online programs such as the virtual-dissection program Froguts. Patricia Weeks, director of the SRI & ETTC, said a major advantage to smart phones is that students already know how to use them.

“The teachers are interested in integration, how to use the technology to improve the lesson,” Weeks said. “With a smart phone or tablet, they don’t have to teach the students how to use the technology itself.”

Speakers stressed that no matter how cool the technology, it is still only a tool, not an end in and of itself.

Pocket-Based Learning: My Cellphone Classroom | Powerful Learning Practice

From the blog:

On my commute one morning recently, one of the local radio stations was discussing a ban on Ugg boots by a Philadelphia school district because students were hiding their cell phones in the calf-high versions and using them in class. The radio announcers were discussing how cell phones in the classroom are a distraction and that “real learning” doesn’t take place with a mobile device in hand. After listening to the announcers and various other callers lament the student use of cell phones in the classroom, I decided to call in and offer a different perspective.

What did I say? Bring them on!

I am a proponent of BYOD (bring your own device) learning. I very rarely travel anywhere without my iPhone or iPad, and I can’t really blame my students if they do the same. I see the “addiction” students have to their cell phones as an opportunity to engage in learning since I view cell phones as another teaching tool, not a distraction.

BYOD is All About Money, Not Real World Experiences

                    One of the tenents of the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) movement in schools is that it is a “real world” example; that in the real world outside of school, there is a variety of devices used and that kids need to be able to adapt and adjust to that shifting environment. 

I wonder however, how “real world” that actually is? For instance, in schools, there is a tendency to standardize around a device: Smart for instance for IWB, PCs for Desktop devices, iPads for tablets and so on. The proponents of BYOD would say that that is not a real situation, that indeed, the world is turning to allowing people to bring their own devices to work, and there is some evidence of that not only in business but in education.   Moreover, proponents throw out a quasi-moral argument, that people should be allowed the freedom to BYOT because it is “right” and “just” and who are we as educators to limit students to a single platform. I agree somewhat with that argument, but I don’t agree that BYOT is  But the main push, I think in BYOD is economical, and not driven by some higher calling. Schools cannot afford to buy everyone everything.

So we are left with a hodgepodge of devices on a hodgepodge of networks. But that is not “real world” as the proponents would like us to think. 

Consider this question: Think of the last time you went to a business and saw people working on their PERSONAL devices (okay, the teenager texting at the grocery store instead of bagging your groceries doesn’t count). 

Let’s start low and go high shall we?

McDonald’s doesn’t allow employees to use personal devices to ring up sales. All the devices are standardized.

Your bank, airline, medical practice, dental practice, DMV office, public library, hell, every place you can think of is standardized on a non-BYOD model. 

So, when we say we are staring BYOD initiatives, let us be honest and say we are doing it to save money. If we say we are doing it for some magnanimous reason, we are lying. 

It is all about the Benjamins.

6 Reasons EdLeaders Should Let Kids Bring Devices to School | Getting Smart

Bans on student use of mobile devices exist for some good reasons—kids use them inappropriately at school and there are safety and security concerns.  So why bother considering a change?  There are six reasons to consider BYOD…